TBA GroupBühler GmbHCimbriaViganTOC EventsTelestack
  • Port of South Louisiana
  • The Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology
  • Van Aalst
  • Port of Stockton
  • Bühler GmbH
  • TOC Events

Cadets miss out on sea time due to pandemic restrictions

Cadets miss out on sea time due to pandemic restrictions

(Posted on 11/10/21)

Restrictions on crew change and repatriations are impacting cadets at a time when the shipping industry desperately needs to recruit more young people.

Crew travel problems can have a knock-on effect on cadet training by preventing a cadet from reaching their ship placement to gain vital experience at sea or delaying them from returning to continue the next phase of their maritime studies.

During a webinar on Seafarers’ Welfare, hosted by the Maritime Authority of Jamaica (MAJ) on behalf of Jamaica’s Ministers of Transport & Mining and Foreign Affairs & Foreign Trade, panellists heard how the rotation of cadet berths has become a victim of the Covid-19 pandemic and global travel restrictions.

Captain Devron Newman, Dean of the Faculty of Nautical Studies and Marine engineering at the Caribbean Maritime University in Jamaica, told the discussion that delays in crew changes adversely impact some cadets because they do not have the necessary documentation, such as Certificates of Competency or Proficiency, that a fully-fledged seafarer has to prove their role as a seafarer. The panel agreed that cadets need to be afforded the same designation as qualified seafarers and be given appropriate passage to and from their ship placements.

Urging more nations to recognise seafarers as “essential workers” and allow them to travel to and from their vessels, Rear Admiral (ret’d) Peter Brady, MAJ Director General, said: “There’s an absolute need for crew changes and repatriation. It is critical for them to visit their families to help their mental health, to rest, and to prepare them for their next posting.”

Advising that, at present only about 60 countries have designated seafarers as essential or key workers, Admiral Brady highlighted the need to encourage and influence other member states to recognise the important role seafarers play in the global supply chain and to put in place measures to enable crew changes and repatriations.

The current problems represent “a human crisis that also impacts families at home and should be condemned,” he commented. “This is just not good enough for these people who have done so much for us.”

The panel discussion, which took place on World Maritime Day, also featured a seafarer’s point of view. Third Officer Javed Loza stressed that the mental health of seafarers was a crucial factor that should be prioritised by the shipping industry. “Good mental health makes all aspects of life onboard positive,” he said, pointing out that a good positive attitude to work and life at sea can also have a beneficial impact on commercial shipping operations.

His comments were echoed by Dr Hortense Ross Innerarity, Superintendent of Pilotage with the Port Authority of Jamaica, who has spent more than 30 years in the shipping industry. Agreeing that seafarer mental health and crew changes should be priorities across the world, she told the debate: “We are very fortunate we don’t have more accidents at sea.”

Efforts to encourage more young people into the maritime industry are of prime importance, the panellists all concurred. Captain Steven Spence MAJ Director of Safety, Environment and Certification, spoke of the need to improve the visibility of shipping. He urged all seafarers to help raise awareness of their profession and called for shipping companies to invest in cadet training to sustain the industry, while advising that cadets need to show loyalty to companies willing to train them.

Latest News

Pioneer voyage data-sharing to enable carbon emissions reductions

(Posted on 19/11/22)

China Merchants Energy Shipping (CMES), BHP and DNV have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)... Read more


Safe Bulkers orders additional retrofits of Alfa Laval PureSOx

(Posted on 19/11/22)

In recent years, Greek shipowner Safe Bulkers has retrofitted Alfa Laval PureSOx exhaust gas cleaning... Read more


Fears of Nordics perfect storm unfounded says Swedish Club

(Posted on 13/11/22)

Times are difficult but no need for despair, was the message from Tore Forsmo, Area Manager, Team Norway... Read more


CSM and Marcap to focus on vessel performance optimisation

(Posted on 13/11/22)

Columbia Shipmanagement (CSM) and Marine Capabilities (MARCAP LLC) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding... Read more


Decarbonisation action plan launched at COP27 to upskill seafarers

(Posted on 09/11/22)

A new Action Plan, launched at COP 27 by UN organizations, shipowners and unions, sets out recommendations... Read more


Algoma to exceed expectations in strong market

(Posted on 09/11/22)

Algoma Central Corporation has reported its results for the three and nine months ended September 30... Read more


ClassNK grants Innovation Endorsement to JRC developed J-Marine Cloud products

(Posted on 02/11/22)

ClassNK has granted its Innovation Endorsement for Products & Solutions to a cloud service called... Read more


CCS opens first Portuguese office

(Posted on 26/10/22)

China Classification Society (CCS) is expanding its European operations after staging the official opening... Read more


IEC Telecom & Blue C Mobile’s maritime satcom solutions for APAC region

(Posted on 26/10/22)

With the Asia-Pacific region witnessing exceptional growth and development, there is also tremendous... Read more


New Inmarsat Fleet Xpress portfolio to meet increasing data usage

(Posted on 20/10/22)

Shipping companies are more data-hungry than ever before, with the maritime industry using 45% more... Read more


Cleveland Cascades LtdThe Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology Port of StocktonSailors SocietyVan AalstPort of South Louisiana
  • TBA Group
  • Telestack

Subscribe to our newsletter

Keep up to date with the latest global news in bulk cargo handling and shipping